24 Vegan Hours in Edinburgh


 *guest post*

Is it easy to be vegan in Edinburgh? Heck yes!

Hi – I’m Emma, and you may know me from the website veganedinburgh.com. I’ve been vegan for about a year and a half now and for around six months of that time I have been singing the praises of the vegan foodie scene in Edinburgh. I’ve made it my life’s mission to eat my way around all the best cruelty-free food in the city and share my mouth-watering discoveries with visitors and locals alike. 

There seems to be this preconceived notion that vegan food is boring and bland – but nothing could be further from the truth. In fact, in my opinion, vegan food is far more inventive and far more tasty than a lot of traditional meat and dairy dishes, and the fact that you’re doing what’s best for your health, the animals and the planet is just the proverbial cherry on the cake. Read on to discover how I would spend a foodie day in the Scotland’s capital, without a single morsel of “rabbit-food” in sight.


 Breakfast – Loudons
94b Fountainbridge, EH3 9QA

One of the most popular breakfast haunts in the city has a wonderful inclusive menu, with a couple of delicious options for vegans. The blueberry pancakes are my current favourite, served with banana cream and cherries. Pair this up with a carrot, ginger and apple juice and you’ve got yourself a power-up breakfast that will stand you in good stead for the rest of the day. 


Mid-morning Coffee – The Milkman
7 Cockburn Street, EH1 1BP

A relatively new addition to the Edinburgh coffee scene, The Milkman on Cockburn Street has a really great vibe and offers one of the best shots of espresso in the city. This place isn’t exclusively vegan by a long stretch, but they have sweet treats that cater for all, including treat-sized bars of Pana Chocolate and the odd vegan option from gluten-free baker Glutteny. 

Lunch – The Pakora Bar
96 Hanover Street, EH2 1DR
Fancy a quick bite for lunch? Look no further than The Pakora Bar, which can be found in the heart of the New Town on Hanover Street. These guys deep-fry vegetables like no-one else in the city, and their £4 – £5 portions of pakora make for a reasonably priced yet indulgent treat. Most of their veggie options are vegan, including mushroom, asparagus, aubergine and (my personal favourite) cauliflower varieties. If you fancy something a bit more, you can also order their curry of the day, which is also usually vegan. 
Dinner – Novapizza
42 Howe Street, EH3 6TH

You don’t have to roll too far away from The Pakora Bar for the next stop on our vegan tour of Edinburgh – Novapizza Vegetarian Kitchen. This Italian restaurant has a completely vegetarian menu, with half of the options suitable for vegans. If you’re craving a vegan pizza fix then this is the place to go – it was even recently named by the Vegan Society as one of the best vegan pizza spots in the UK. Need I say more?

Evening Cocktails – Foundry 39 
39a Queensferry Street, EH2 4RA

Again, this is not a vegan place in the slightest (in fact, their food menu is completely devoid of vegan options at the time of writing – boo!), but sometimes I find these “accidentally vegan” treats that I just have to shout about. Case in point – the Far Eastern Orchard cocktail at Foundry 39. Made with coconut cream, lemongrass-infused vodka and vanilla syrup, it’s a lovely rich concoction that is perfect for rounding off an indulgent day of eating the best vegan food in Edinburgh. 

But enough about me – what about you? Where are your favourite places to eat vegan in Edinburgh? Let me know in the comments below or come and say hello to me wherever you get your social media – I’m on FacebookInstagramTwitter and Pinterest. Can’t wait to hear your suggestions! 🙂
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Odeon Fort Kinnaird: Lego Batman Movie

Last night Jack and I were big kids for a few hours as we settled in to watch The Lego Batman Movie with a big bucket of pick n mix sweeties. We were the only adults in the cinema without kids, ut it was great. If you like superheroes, big celebrity voice actors, comedy, catchy songs, and most importantly lego, then I would 100% recommend this film, and Odeon Fort Kinnaird in Edinburgh is the place to see it, with huge screens, super comfortable seats and  spot on service. Big thank you to Hummingbird Communications for this fun date night!

We were treated like total VIPs from the moment we got there to the moment we left (it was a crazy hailstorm outside!), with super helpful staff, delicious snacks and just loads of fun little extras. Its definitely worth the extra journey to the outskirts of the city sometimes for a much more special experience than in central cinemas.

See my review of a previous trip to Odeon Fort Kinnaird to see Moana: http://www.urbanity-blog.com/2016/12/moana-at-odeon-fort-kinnaird.html

Watch the trailer for The Lego Batman movie below. What do you think?
[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3z2t7FctEd4%5D
Odeon Fort Kinnaird can be found in the Fort Kinnaird retail park located off the A1 Newcraighall Junction. Plenty of Lothian bus routes take you straight there! Check it out for yourself here:

Ruth @ Urbanity xxx
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Money Fashion Power

Fashion Revolution is launching pre-orders for the first in a series of collectible fanzines uncovering the stories behind clothing. The inaugural issue is called MONEY FASHION POWER and explores themes of transparency, sustainability, inequality and ethics in the fashion industry. Through poetry, illustration, photography, editorial and playful games, readers will discover hidden stories behind their clothing, what the price they pay for fashion means, and how their purchasing power can make a positive difference.


 

Illustration by @alecdoherty
Before they reach the shop shelves, our clothes have been on a very long journey, and made by many different people. What do you know about where your clothes come from? Do you know who made them, in what country, and in what conditions? And do you care? Have you ever wondered #whomademyclothes? Or what you can do to make sure my purchases are empowering the people who make my clothes, rather than exploit them? Do your purchases empower or exploit?

Illustration by @thedrawingdoor 
It takes a garment worker 18 months to earn what a fashion brand CEO makes on their lunch break. Shocking, I know. And the complexities of power make it disheartening to wonder if you can make a difference in this exploitative supply chain. But Fashion Revolution have started a movement to empower consumers like you and me to actually change things for the better.

Illustration by @tyler_spangler

“Fashion Revolution is a global movement that works for a more sustainable fashion industry, campaigning for a systemic reform of

the industry with a special focus on the need for greater transparency in the fashion supply chain. Fashion Revolution is a non-profit organisation with presence in more than 90 countries around the world. Our vision is a fashion industry that values people, the environment, profit and creativity in equal measure. Fashion Revolution works all year round to raise awareness of the fashion industry’s most pressing issues, advocate for positive change, and celebrate those who are on a journey to create a more ethical and sustainable future for fashion.”
 

Illustration by @chrissieabbott
Find out more and order your print copy of the fanzine at:
Ruth @ Urbanity xxx
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Style Concierge: Personal Shopping at Harvey Nichols

 

 

As some of you may know, early last year I worked for Menswear at Harvey Nichols in Edinburgh, and recently I’ve been delighted to be invited back as a blogger to explore some of their efforts to become a style destination for truly experiential retail. Last week I had the chance to take part in Style Concierge, a dedicated personal shopping service offered at the department store, to style some outfits with the latest designer collections in store.

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On Therapy and Prozac

Photo by Holly May Wesley
Heres the thing about mental health…its a stubborn little bastard. 
Find out why I’m still on anti-depressants and still attend therapy, even after all this time. 



Statistics suggest that for everyone on earth theres at least someone in your life who has experienced mental health problems. You may have seen them through the highs and lows, and now assume the struggle is over. Its easy to miss the symptoms of depression, anxiety and eating disorders when the physical, visible signs are no longer there, and perhaps after some time and effort the sufferer has managed to keep their emotions under control, allowing them to lead a perfectly normal life, just like everyone else.


But there is so much more beneath the surface. Since I’ve passed that initial barrier to recovery for my mental health, including getting physically healthy and emotionally stable again, getting back on track with my career, studies, social life and relationships, it would be hard to guess there could be anything wrong. I’m a total overachiever and perfectionist, and I’ve learnt to channel this the right way now, but as I’ve often been told I’m like a duck or a swan; smooth and calm above the water but frantically kicking underneath.

I’m not ashamed to say that I still heavily rely on a high dose of anti-depressants to get me through the day. They say half the world’s on prozac, and well, I wouldn’t be surprised. Its given me my confidence and my ability to function back, and for me personally its worked well in tandem with other recovery efforts. But what I often ponder is what would happen if I stopped? How much of this ‘doing well’ phase is because of them, and how much is just me? Will I ever be able to shake the taboo or the labels?

I called this post ‘On Therapy and Prozac’ because I see them both as a kind of drug, to be weaned off, eventually. Therapy is another one of those taboos, which I would usually never bring up to people in real life (the joy of hiding behind a computer screen eh!)  But I’m at that odd stage where everything is totally fine- better than fine mostly- but after many years with various disorders, there is a very blurred line between identity and illness. Of course not one person would guess that my eating disorder (I really hate that phrase. I need a new name for it. A fellow patient in hospital hated the word anorexia so much that she called it ‘oil slick’. No clue why!) still sticks around at every mealtime, often in unexpected, newly evolved ways. I’m lucky enough to be inundated with support, but 


So I guess the point of this post is to read between the lines. People in your life may still need help, or at the very least respect, for their mental health problems, even if it may seem that they recovered years ago. And if therapy and prozac is what they need, then thats what they will still be on, despite all odds.
Photo by Daina Renton for Witch Way Magazine.
Ruth @ Urbanity xxx


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