As much as any other millennial wannabe hipster, I love a good browse in Urban Outfitters, although for my skint self it’s usually solely in the sale section. I have some great pieces of clothing from the American fashion and lifestyle store (which also owns Anthropologie), and really enjoy the selection of lingerie, books and homeware.  However, I am sure you are all aware of several controversial products they have released over the past few years that have caused a hell of a stir on social media. And encouraged many people like me to boycott and campaign against Urban Outfitters. Check out their top three most risqué collections below. 

 I also strongly recommend a read of ‘Mental Health is not A Fashion Statement‘ by blogger Frankly Ms Shankly, slamming online retailer Rad for their equally ignorant slogan tees. 

 
This monstrosity, a crop top covered with the word ‘Depression’ in a tacky word-cloud style, worn by a smiling model, makes me scream internally. Knowing the mental illness far too well, and that one of its most discerning features is isolation and secrecy, this vulgar creation is all kinds of ridiculous. Are they aiming for a target market of depressed people? Or just those ignorant few who think being depressed will make them ‘tumblr famous’?
 
Now this was the worse (un)intentional mistake the company has ever made. And that includes the ‘eat less’ t-shirt and the anti-Semitic/holocaust logo top. This sweatshirt with the Kent State University logo has tie-dye reminiscent of blood spatters, which gives a haunting reminder of a brutal police massacre that killed students during a Vietnam war protest in the 1970s. Bloody hell.
This one needs not a caption. White is the New Black. Will always, ALWAYS be too soon.
I don’t have links to these products as they were all of course recalled to preserve their precious reputation. Sorry for the hate post Urban Outfitters, as I do sometimes enjoy your overpriced dungarees and 80s bumbags. Sometimes.
Ruth @ Urbanity xxx
 
 
 

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